Category Archives: In Their Own Words

Peace At Last

neil-elaine

This beautiful photograph above comes from the Davis family collection. It shows long term Berowra resident, Neil Davis, aged fourteen who was taken into the city by his older sister, Elaine.

Neil and Elaine are wearing French tricolour ribbons as a mark of their patriotic support and happiness on this day of the Japanese surrender, 15th August, 1945. In 1922 a bronze palm leaf with a tricolour sash had been presented on behalf of the then French president to the Australian Prime Minister, Billy Hughes to honour those Australians who gave their lives in the First World War.

The young brother and sister who like so many knew the pain of the loss, or life changing injury, of close friends or family members, are standing with the excited crowds in Martin Place, Sydney. Elaine’s husband, Bill Foster was still serving with the navy in the Pacific at the time.

News of the Japanese surrender had spread around the world, finally the war in Asia and the Pacific was over, the horrific Second World War was over. Neil recalls that, in those days, it was exceptional to take a trip to the city from Berowra. This day everything was extraordinary, the spontaneous celebration, the relief, the euphoria, the war on Australia’s door step was over, the lucky ones were coming home, people danced in the streets, victory and peace at last.

Ann

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , ,

Sixty-Six Years Young

After World War Two finished in 1945 and ex-servicemen returned to civilian life, many couples married and began buying their own quarter acre blocks (around 1,000 square metres) in Berowra.

One such couple was Jack and Kath Molyneaux who bought 47a Woodcourt Road in 1949 and six years later purchased number 47.

Building materials were in very short supply so instead of building a large garage in which to live, as many couples did, Jack and Kath built the left hand end of their future home. This took nearly two years and by then their eldest child, Chris, had arrived.

Roof titles were available only after being on the waiting list for about six months so a temporary “roof” of “Malthoid”, (two ply felt impregnated with bitumen) was used instead. (pictures 1 and 2) It was held down by battens, but one day huge hailstones punched holes in the “Malthoid”! Imagine the mess!

Finally, by 1953, the rest of their home was completed. (picture 3) If you look at 47a today, you’ll still see the chimney but because the house has been extended over the years the chimney is now in the centre of the dwelling!

Picture 4 shows Chris, in the corner, cooling off in Molyneaux’s concrete wading pool, with some young neighbours. The pool converted to a sand pit in winter. Note the old 44 gallon drum, with lid and brick, used as an incinerator.

Shirley Collins

Tagged , , , , ,

Jumbled Junk And Busy Boys

This is the story of 6 or 7 Berowra teenagers who in about 1956 discovered the dismembered parts of an old 1931 Ford. They lay scattered around in an empty block – 57 Woodcourt Road, Berowra. Photos 1 and 2 show the parts being surveyed. A decision was made to reassemble it so the work began.

The boys ranged in age from 14 – 16 years. When the task was finally successfully completed, Photos 3 and 4, they drove it up to Roy Corrigan’s Ampol garage – corner Berowra Waters Road and Eastern Road. The Registration was never granted! Note also Corrigans Busses and the old pine trees on the block next door, which is now number 109 Berowra Waters Road.

What became of the “car” is not known, but registered or not I think they got much pleasure from all their hard work.

(Names withheld – but available)

Shirley Collins

Tagged , , , , ,

trig

Our recent guest post by Roslyn Mort has sparked memories for another Berowra resident, David Lever. David has shared the beautiful photograph above of another trig which was once in the Berowra region. David notes that . . .

. . . this is Want Trig which is at the end of Shark Rock Ridge as it merges into Want Spur, east of Berowra

Does anybody else remember the trig stations which were once such a central part of our surveying history? If so, we’d love to hear from you, and of course see any photographs you might be able to share!

Elissa

Tagged , , ,

New Exhibition – Tall Tales, Or True

advertising imageToday, Berowra Living History is proud to announce the launch of our newest exhibition, Tall Tales, Or True. This exhibition focuses on the more unusual stories we have had recounted to us, or come across in research. We have discovered some wonderful images to include, and made a few changes to several of these in order to more accurately reflect the subject matter. Get ready for nudists, UFO’s, and even a perilous escape from a tin of salmon – simply click the image above to discover more!

Of course, if you have a tall tale, or true, which you would like to see added, we would also love to hear from you. Please leave a comment or send us an email!

Elissa

Tagged

Out Along Turner Road

THEN

In 1974, long time Berowra resident Tony Sneddon wrote an excellent, detailed geography assignment on Berowra. He has generously shared this document with berowralivinghistory.com.The following 2 photos and quote come from that assignment. (Tony and his parents and siblings originally lived at 145 Turner Road Berowra Heights)

2015-03-24 17.04.11

Turner Road looking North – arrows from the top indicate the Sneddon home location, the section of unsealed road and Gooraway Place & Blue Ridge Crescent.

a map of the Turner Road area showing the proposed and existing development by the '70's including the position of the Sneddon family home.

Map of the Turner Road area showing the proposed and existing development by the ’70’s including the position of the Sneddon family home.

“…When my father came to Berowra he bought five and a half acres of land in Turner road about one mile from the crossroads where the shopping centre now stands. The land was portion 365. Most of the surrounding land was sold off in five acre blocks….from Gooraway Place to my father’s subdivision is crown land covered by bush with no seal on the road.”

NOW-

2015-03-21 16.10.032015  T rd BR  G rds rotate

Turner Road, looking north again, seems to show little change. The road is fully sealed now and curbed but heavy bush is prevalent.

215 Google map Turner Rd Croped

The Google map clearly shows the ongoing development of and around Turner Road Berowra Heights.

Quite clearly further land division occurred which allowed for more houses such as we see today in this area.

Robyn

Tagged , , , , , , ,

A Follow Up To Sustainability In Berowra

Berowra is an amazing community, with a fabulous history, and at Berowra Living History, we love nothing more than hearing from our community. Your memories, photos, memorabilia and recollections are the lifeblood of the project. Berowra Living History is the history of the community – you! This is why we love hearing from our community and one recent comment was made which we wanted to share.

Last week, we looked at Sustainability in Berowra and the many drives for waste paper and other products which local residents took part in. Neil Davis replied with not just a lovely comment, but a wonderful recollection of the time:

Around this time I, and two of my friends Geoff, and Dennis Doherty were members of The 1st Hornsby boy scout troop.

These collection days were organised, and the community asked to assist. The scouting movement was asking those boys who could, to participate.
After X amount of hours spent on collection days, each scout would receive a badge, of which we were all very proud, to be worn on the scout uniform shirt. This badge was of red silk, with the letters N S, in gold, standing for national service.

On the days of the collections many of the community became involved along with a number of school children. A local man Erney Baker, used to come along with his lorry, an old Willys Knight . He would drive around Berowra with all of us young ones, going house to house, asking for items to help. We would collect car tyres, old copper boilers, scrap brass, bottles ,old car batteries, news papers . . .

While writing this, my mind travels back to (old Berowra) the time when there were only 300 residents on the electoral roll. Most of us were a bit poor financially, but we were soooooo, patriotic.

If you have recollections or even just a short comment you would like to share, we would love to hear from you!

 

Tagged , , , , , ,

Berowra Netball Club Part 1 – The Beginning, 1960

Badge

“Our club began when the men on the committee of Berowra Soccer Club asked Mrs Joan Olson to ‘do something for the girls’.

Up to this time the boys had both cricket and soccer. There was only social tennis played on private courts. If you wanted to join the Brownies you travelled to Hornsby.

Mrs Olson had played Women’s Basketball at school in Invercargill, New Zealand, so Women’s Basketball it was.

The Soccer Club provided the back bone of the ‘club’ for quite a few years. Mrs Olson attended meetings and finances were the Soccer Club’s.”

Thank you to Mrs Jenny Bentley nee Olson for access to records, photos, memorabilia and display items from Berowra Netball Club. Thank you also to members of the first two Berowra Netball teams for their memories drawn from their club’s 50th anniversary display items and shared above.

Ann

Tagged , , , , ,

My Job As An Apprentice Baker

Jim in his baking uniform

Jim in his baking uniform

I worked for A R Kerslake of Berowra between January 1944 and June 1950. His business was located at the beginning of Berowra Waters Road near the Pacific Highway.

My wage was f1.10.0 per week and was 2/6 above the award. (A tradesman’s wage in 1948 was f7.11.0 & in 1950 f9.13.0)

I assisted in making the dough between 7&8 pm. Mr Kerslake then prepared the dough about 2am. He then set the alarm for me to get up as I slept in a room on the adjacent house verandah. I would then prepare the dough and remove some from the trough ready for weighing and dividing for the tins.

I would then wake the boss about 3am.

We had a dough mixer and later a machine for dividing the dough when weighed and ready for placing into the tins for the oven.

Once the bread was baked in a wood fired oven and stacked on a racked trolly we would have breakfast.
The boss would load the van for deliveries and I would clean and grease the tins, and put a bag of flour in the mixer ready for that night. I would clean the firebox and cart wood in for the next morning’s baking.
We produced about 300 loaves of white and 50 of brown bread.

When I started work at the bakery we worked for 5 1/2 days. Later this was reduced to 5days. Bread was 5 pence a loaf in 1943 and 51/2 pence about 1944.

Jim Hatfield

Tagged , , , , , ,

In Their Own Words – Off For A Dip

Image courtesy of N. Davis

Image courtesy of N. Davis

Our family photo above shows the tidal baths and people enjoying the water at Berowra Creek now Berowra Waters. In the foreground is our son, Mark aged three making the year of the photo, 1958.

My wife, Merle and I remember the day being very hot, so off we went for a dip!

The tide looks about half, with a few rocks showing. If you look very closely, you will see in the background, the Rex Jones Commemorative Monument. In the flagstone apron sloping down towards the water, there were two small garden plots probably about 18 inches (or 45.75cm) square on either side. If I remember correctly rosemary bushes were planted in these plots.

When we were young teenagers this was a popular spot to sun bake.

Neil Davis

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,
Advertisements