Tag Archives: domestic

Those Steam Cars in Hillcrest Road Berowra

Note the two tramcars exposed

Note the two tramcars exposed

The 2 tramcars 72B (built 1891) and 93B (built 1889) ceased service in 1932 and were later stored at Randwick Tramway Workshops. Both tramcars were purchased later that year and for the next 65 years 93B served as 2 bedrooms whilst 72B was fitted out as a dining room, kitchen, and bathroom/laundry/toilet.

On arrival in Berowra they were placed along the land on pre-built brick piers with space between to build a lounge room. An overall roof was built which in retrospect contributed to the preservation of the tram bodies from the elements.

Three families were associated with the life of this ‘tramcar house’. Then in 1997 a new owner decided on a demolition in order to build a modern home.

The demolition was undertaken by The Steam Rail and Preservation Society after agreeing to purchase the 2 tramcars and demolish the remainder of the house and leave the block clear. Approximately 500 man hours were recorded in this task undertaken between 4 January 1997 and 10 March 1997.

The cars were loaded onto semi trailers and taken to Valley Heights Locomotive Depot Heritage Museum for storage and eventual restoration. 93B re entered service in 2005 after being restored while 72B awaits restoration.

Looking down into lounge and car

Looking down into lounge and car

Information taken from the Archival Material held by The Steam and Rail Preservation (Co-op) Society Ltd. Tuscalum Road  Valley Heights, New South Wales.

Courtesy of Peter Stock

 

Robyn

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September Mystery Solved

Yes, you are correct if you think that our September Mystery Object is a child’s school LUNCH BOX.

In the 1940s Berowra resident Joan Milne was given this little black lunch box when she started kindergarten. As you can see it was well looked after and sturdy enough to still be in good shape today.

It has a little brown leather strap handle and a metal clasp which still functions. Manufactured in wartime the little lunch box is practical, undecorated and made to last.

If you would like to find out more about this lunch box and others visit:

http://tinglefactor.typepad.com/thetinglefactorbox/2014/05/its-a-little-treasure-chest-lunch-box.html

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In Their Own Words – Super Shopping

Weller Photo 1

Once, in a time before it was common for all of your shopping needs to be available online, waiting to be delivered to your home, an enterprising Berowra family provided a much needed service to the community. Karla Weller recalls:

In 1959 Hans and Karla Weller of Turner Road (since 1957 and still there) started Super Shopping Service – who remembers ????

It was then a novel idea: collecting orders every Tuesday and delivering them to customers in Berowra and Mt. Kuringai (and later Cowan, Mt. Colah and Asquith) later in the week.

The goods delivered comprised groceries, meat, fruit and veges, delicatessen, bulk store goods (then in vogue), dry cleaning and much more.

It was a welcome service in an area with few shops and little transport and for people without their own transport. Especially the elderly were happy to have their orders delivered. In those days it was even possible to leave the door open so that goods could be put in the kitchen and the meat in the fridge! So the customer did not have to stay home to take delivery.

weller photo 2

As the business grew a shop (later demolished) was opened at the Cross roads and later they bought Max Taylor’s(?) fruit shop next-door (also gone – now Homebiz).

The idea was ahead of its time: it would have been simpler to run with a computer and mobile phones – then non-existent.

It was a period in which the banks were tight-fisted and so a point was reached where necessary extension was not possible and of course new competition from supermarkets made business less profitable, despite the hard work that went into it.

So after Christmas 1965 the fruit shop was sold and the delivery service closed.

The type of business was ahead of its time and would now be a bonus for working mothers and seniors in the community in this era.

We wonder who remembers the service or has it been completely forgotten?

Karla Weller

Images courtesy of Karla Weller

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In Their Own Words: House Building At 21 Berowra Waters Road

Shirleys House

Every concrete block in the garage (finished 1946) and in the house (finished 1948) was made by my parents Bert & Thelma Hobday.

Cement was scarce (the war had just finished). So hence the slow build.

The blocks were made with sand, cement and ashes. The latter were got by the trailer-load from the ‘San’ hospital – the residue in their coke or coal fired (?) burners (for the heating of water for the laundry etc). Dad shovelled in the ingredients while Mum turned the concrete mixer by hand. When mixed, the ingredients were pressed into greased moulds for ‘curing’.

Photo (circa 1954) and words courtesy of Shirley Collins (nee Hobday)

The flowering Double Ornamental Peach tree in the foreground is a reminder that Spring 2014 cannot be too far away. Many blossoms & buds are already appearing in gardens around our local area of Berowra.

Robyn.

 

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Horse Power

Bill On Dolly

Bill On Dolly

Today Berowra like most parts of Sydney is buzzing with cars. Our shopping centre and railway car parks are full to capacity a lot of the time.

It is hard to imagine Berowra in the period shown in this picture from the 192Os. The photo is from the collection of the late Bill Foster who is shown as a child on the back of a much loved working horse, “Dolly”. Bill’s parents have taken a moment from the hard work of running their general store near Berowra railway station, to pose for the photo.

By the time Bill was in grades 5 and 6 at the original Berowra Public School, his father would drive the horse and cart up to the school at 3:30pm. Bill would then begin the afternoon grocery run, collect orders for the next day and twice a week take produce, mainly eggs, from the various local poultry farms to the railway station for dispatch to the markets in town. Along his route it was not unusual for young Bill to be offered a cup of milk from people, like the artist, Margaret Preston’s maid, Myra.

At the end of the rounds Bill unhitched the cart and fed “Dolly”. Bill remembered his father always being most concerned about “Dolly” being adequately fed even in difficult times.

Today, 1st August is the official birthday of all thoroughbred horses in the Southern Hemisphere while their cousins in the Northern hemisphere count 1st January as their birthday.

We salute the working horses of Berowra and worldwide.

Ann

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In Their Own Words – Dr Rich

Dr Beryl Rich

Dr Beryl Rich

The following account comes from Dr Rich, who was the first doctor (that we know of) to work in Berowra. She worked here from 1951 to 1958.

My name is Beryl Rich and as far as I know, I was the first resident medico in Berowra. This was quite unplanned. I graduated from Sydney University in March, 1944. I worked in hospitals for several years and planned to specialise in Obstetrics. However, I got married and started a family which was the end of my specialist plans.

As older people will recall, housing was very scarce in the post war years and like many young couples, we were forced to live with my parents. This proved to be most unsatisfactory and when my husband heard through a colleague of a partly built house for sale in Berowra, we jumped at the opportunity. I had continued working part time in a hospital but had no clear plans for my future.

We moved to Berowra about September, 1950. It was only a small, rather scattered village at that time. The house we bought was in Alan Rd, but the post office general store, run by Ernie and Joe Foster was on the highway.

Dr Eric Giblin, whom I had known at University, had started a general practice, based in Asquith which extended to Brooklyn on the Hawkesbury. When he found out I was living in Berowra, he suggested I start a practice there and cover from Berowra to Brooklyn, so in 1951 that is what I did. We added a small surgery and waiting room to our little house.

At the beginning of 1953, a fully built house on the highway came on the market and we bought that as the highway appeared to be the centre of activity. The Crossroads had only a small general store and it was not realized then that it would become the busy centre it is to-day. The house was on a double block so there was plenty of room to add a surgery and waiting room.

Thank-you to Susan Lynd for the kind donation of Dr Rich’s memories of Berowra. If you have any stories to share, please leave us a comment or send an email to the team!

Robyn.

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Living And Learning Together

Berowra Public School Upper Division 1950

Berowra Public School Upper Division 1950

We thank sisters, Pat McCready and Jill Brancourt for sharing this photo from their collection. Young Jill (Ewings) is the eight child from the left in the middle row. The teacher-in-charge standing behind his young scholars is the much admired Mr Leslie Garside.

Two sisters, Betty in the middle row and Joan in the front row are members of the Hamilton family. All seven siblings went to Berowra Public School. This Aboriginal family came down from Groote Eylandt Mission where the parents had been taken when they were children. The family was very highly regarded in the Berowra community.

Currently we are in NAIDOC Week which is celebrated around Australia in early July each year. Interestingly the acronym which stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee has become the name of the week itself rather than just a committee.

Do contact us if you can help us name some of the Upper Division of 1950!

Ann

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All in A Row At Berowra Creek

As it was planned..

Donated to blh, with thanks to Raine and Horne

Donated to blh, with thanks to Raine and Horne

This copy of a 1926 stamped advertisement was probably used to promote the sale of the 32 mainly water’s edge blocks of land down at Berowra Creek. So many & all side by side. The auction was on April 29,1926.  The following appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald Saturday 1May,1926-

‘REAL ESTATE..BUSY WEEK.. The fortnightly indoor auctions of Messrs Raine & Horne was held on Thursday and largely attended…There was a good demand for the Berowra water front allottments, 32 in Silverwater Estate.They were all sold at from 5/- to 37/6 per foot. Total sales £1696…

 

As it is today..

houses

This photograph shows some of the  houses that are currently there in the “row”

Robyn

 

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The Baby Weighing In At Berowra

IMG

Image courtesy of Elizabeth Miller

Berowra and Berowra Heights after World War 11 (late 1940s and into 1950s) became an area of very fast population growth.  Quarter acre blocks of land sold for $140 to $200 and a labourer’s wage was approximately $12 per week.

From a population of about 500 the area began to enlarge as many couples moved into cosy garages, until building supplies became easier to get. And so came the babies! The new mums often needed advice and support and that’s where the Karitane Mobile Clinic Bus was a blessing.

Berowra at the time had no doctors (Dr Rich came later) and no chemists so the mums would catch Corrigans bus to Hornsby. The Karitane sister set up a room at the CWA Hall in Hornsby Park and that’s where Berowra mums could have their babies checked and gain advice.

One such mum from Woodcourt Rd, Berowra was Kath Molyneaux who had done the trip often with her son Chris. She made enquiries about the chances of the Karitane Clinic coming to Berowra and was told that if she could guarantee at least 10 mothers fortnightly and that all would contribute one shilling and 9 pence (18c) to defray costs, then the Clinic would come.

Kath set out trudging the rutted and muddy streets of Berowra seeking out the necessary number of mums. She was successful and so from about 1951 the Clinic would come to Berowra Heights and park on the “Open Air Pictures Block” (the present Uniting Church location). The tennis court had a shed and I’m told, on rainy days whilst mums were waiting, they’d shelter there.

By 1952 the contribution for the clinic was 2 shillings (20c) and by 1958 it had risen to 3 shillings (30c) per visit.

Down at Berowra the Bus Clinic was held beside the Anglican Rectory near the old Netball Courts. It came there fortnightly on Wednesdays from 9am to 12 noon. After the Methodist Church was begun (on the theatre site) in 1962 the “Berowra Junction” (“Crossroads” to us) Clinic was from 1:30pm to 3:30pm. By the late 1960s the bus was parked either outside the Butcher’s shop, (part of HomeBiz now) or by the old pine trees on Berowra Waters Rd between the Crossroads and the Barnetts Rd start.

Finally, Hornsby Council built and opened the Berowra Baby Health Centre in December, 1973 at 122 Berowra Waters Rd. So ended about 20 years of sterling service from the Ku-ring-gai Karitane Mobile Clinic for the mums and babies of Berowra and Berowra Heights.

Shirley Collins

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Dolls In The Tavern

David Lever 1

If you look closely at David Lever’s painting of what was the old Tavern on the Pacific Highway, Berowra, you may be able to see the reason for our blog title!

While the Tavern of yesteryear was the hub of many activities like dances and school concerts it apparently also attracted attention for another reason.

Long time Berowra resident, Pam Gartung has fond memories of Mollie Dwyer and her great skills at knitting and sewing. Mollie features in the following extract from Worth Reporting on p.38 of The Australian Women’s Weekly of 26th November, 1949. At the time this popular magazine cost sixpence!

Knits Dolls’ Woollies on Hatpins

MOLLIE DWYER, of Berowra, N.S.W. has turned her childhood hobby of dressing dolls into a business. She makes baby clothes and exquisite dolls’ frocks, which are shown in a window of the Berowra Tavern where tourist buses stop each day. Hungry tourists have even been known to miss afternoon tea through spending too long gazing at Miss Dwyer’s handicraft.

Mollie Dwyer believes in making dolls’ clothes that are pretty but which can be taken off and washed by the young owner. One of the most beautiful dolls we saw wore vest, pants, petticoat, dress, shoes and socks and bonnet. For the doll’s one-and-a-half-inch feet, Mollie Dwyer had made quilted satin shoes, inventing the pattern and sewing away until midnight

Dresses are of the finest organdie or marquisette, appliqucd with hand-made medallions or sometimes with lace. Frocks and underclothes unfasten and can he laid out for ironing.

But not all the dolls wear summer dresses. Many are dressed in finely knitted wool. “I do the knitting on hatpins,” said talented Molly Dwyer.

This article is accessible through TROVE.

Ann

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